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Monthly Archives: January 2018

Disadvantages of Wood Siding

Maintenance

One of the most common complaints about wood siding is the level of maintenance it requires. Siding like vinyl and fiber cement are low maintenance, and will last for years to come. However, wood is porous, making it more vulnerable to the outdoor elements, especially moisture. Mold, mildew, wood rot, and more are common issues associated with moisture problems. This means it must be stained and painted at all times, routinely re-sealed and weather-proofed, and cleaned on a more frequent basis. Not only is this level of maintenance difficult to keep up with, it can be costly and time-consuming too. This is something to think about, especially if you are not in a position to provide the maintenance yourself, nor hire a professional company to provide it for you.

Aesthetics

Another common issue with wood siding is warping and swelling, which is caused by moisture absorption. Once the panels dry out again, they do not return to their original shape. This leads to gaps, cracks, energy loss, pest infestations, and more. Not only does this affect the overall aesthetics of a property, it will cost you in the end since defective panels and boards will need to be replaced to ensure the structural integrity of a home or building. In serious cases, it can also increase home energy bills.

Durability

Durability and longevity are common concerns when it comes to wooden siding. Because wood is a natural element that is porous and susceptible to moisture absorption, it is always at risk of wood rot and dampening. Overtime, this can cause wood to soften and deteriorate, which leads to all sorts of structural and aesthetic problems. And in the end, all of these problems require money, time, and construction to resolve. This is especially true for wood rot that results in mold and mildew outbreaks.

Winterize Your Home

Start Winterizing Your Home by Sealing Leaks

One of the best ways to begin to winterize your home is to actually check the exterior of your house for cracks. A crack along the outside of your home lets heat out, making it more difficult to keep your house warm. Even houses with siding around the outside could have cracks along the fireplace, or even under the eaves. Windows and doors are the most popular areas for cracks.

Once you’ve located the problem areas, you can fill the cracks with a caulking compound. Apply a generous amount of caulking directly into the cracks and smooth the caulking out with your finger or a tool. Be sure to seal the crack completely as you smooth out the caulking.

Winterizing your Home by Protecting your Pipes

Pipes that go unprotected can freeze and burst with time. Broken pipes can cost thousands of dollars to replace. Avoid unnecessary costs by caring for your pipes properly in cold weather.

To start, identify any water hoses that may be hooked up. These hoses that are filled with water should be removed and emptied and put away during the freezing weather.

Next, outside faucets or piping can be protected from cold weather with heat tape. You can purchase heat tape from any local hardware store. Wrap the tape around exposed outdoor pipes and this should be enough to keep your faucets from freezing. If you have an outdoor pump system, even if it’s in a shed, it could still freeze up and cause problems if the weather is well below freezing. Use a heat lamp in the late evening hours to prevent freezing.

Winterizing Your Home with Insulation

Finally, if your house is lacking proper insulation, you could save hundreds of dollars on heating costs by getting it installed. Contact a professional installer and get an estimate for putting in insulation or get an evaluation if you don’t know if you need insulation.
Even if your home does have insulation, have it checked for any damage caused by leaks.

Insulation is inexpensive to have installed. You can do it yourself and save money by going to your local hardware store and getting the supplies.

Don’t forget to check the attic space for proper insulation. Many homebuilders may skip putting insulation in the roof to save on building costs, but this form of additional insulation significantly reduces heat releasing through the attic.

Quality Interior Shutter

Shutters are built from a quality material

Wood is the most preferable material for building shutters, and not all woods are made alike. Basswood is a superior wood because it is among the straightest of hardwoods with a fine uniform texture and indistinct grain. It can be sanded and stained to a smooth finish, and it is lightweight yet very strong.

Shutters are purchased from reliable company

You should research the company from which you plan to purchase your shutters. They need to be a reputable, knowledgeable, support oriented, and accessible. We recommend you test their knowledge by asking questions. Check out their credibility with an organization such as the Better Business Bureau, and check to see if they have a list of customer comments or references. The company needs to be prepared to communicate all of the necessary information to you about purchasing interior shutters. They need to have a staff that is experienced and available for technical questions. It is frustrating when the only knowledgeable person is always “in the field.”

Shutters are mortised for hinges

Mortised hinges are important to achieve a tight fit within your window opening. Without a mortised panel, a gap appears on the hanging side that allows light to break between the shutter panel and the window jamb. It should not be necessary to mortise the window jamb.

Shutters are rabbeted stiles between panels

Rabbeted stiles between shutter panels reduces light breaks between panels. A significant gap is created in between panels that are simply butted up against one another.

View a shutter sample

The shutter company should be able to supply you with a finished sample shutter. This way you can view the quality of construction and finish first-hand. It is beneficial for you also to hold the shutter in the window to visualize how the shutters will attach and look in your house.

Shutters should have quality finish

A quality paint or stain finish is essential to the overall satisfaction with your shutter purchase. A paint finish should be smooth, thick, and complete. You should be unable to feel the wood grain and it should show through the paint. A stain finish should be even with a proper top protective coat.

Info about Warm up with Firewood

Ash, Oak, Beech, Birch, Hickory and Hard Maple are by far the best types of wood to use. They each produce a high amount of heat, which is one of the most important considerations. Each of these species burn extremely well, and they are all relatively easy to split. Another feature of these types is that they produce very little heavy smoke and very few sparks.

Aside from the species mentioned above, Soft Maple, Black Cherry, and Yellow Pine are the next best to use. The Soft Maple and Black Cherry each produce a decent amount of heat, but they both burn well and are easy to split. They also produce a low amount of heavy smoke and sparks. Yellow Pine is also quite a decent wood to use. The only significant drawback with Pine is that it tends to smoke a lot, and it may not be ideal for burning inside your home.

Elm, Sweetgum, Basswood, Poplar, and White Pine are all decent species. If you are unable to get any of the wood mentioned above, these will work just fine. None of them produce an impressive amount of heat, but in certain cases some heat is better than none. These species also produce more smoke and sparks than the aforementioned. The Elm and Sweetgum tend not to burn very well, and they are often difficult to split. These woods should be used when you have no other choices available to you.

As is the case with any heating system, your wood-burning stove should be installed by a professional. It must be checked and maintained annually, along with your chimney. Remember to always make safety a priority, and to keep your fireplace tools and fire extinguisher close by in case of an emergency.